Feb. 17-23: La Vita è Bella,

Reading Into Thin Air, I learned two new words to be employed at a scrabble game coming soon. Cwm, and nak. Cwm, pronounced koom, is a welsh-term meaning valley, and has been adopted by climbers internationally. Nak is a female yak. I’m ready to play!

This week, everything has pointed towards consecration.

Tuesday, I left work and went to Buffalo Wild Wings. There, I met up with Kevin, a roommate from my freshman year. We ate some wings and caught up. It’s impossible to stay uber-close, but its good to stay in touch with friends. Kevin moved back from California a few months ago, and I enjoyed our time at the restaurant.

Wednesday was a busy day. That night, I was invited to attend a talk by Sharon Eubank, the democratic debate was happening, book club was going on, and the church released its new handbook which I really wanted to read. I missed Sis. Eubanks talk, but staying up later than normal, managed to squeeze the rest in.

Thursday I went to Institute. This was right after going to the gym so David Kaiser went with me. The class was good, and we socialized a bit afterward. What was really touching was what happened after that.

Last week, a woman came up to me and asked me for a ride. She looked kind of homeless, was missing most of her teeth and couldn’t really look you in the eyes. I said yes, I’d be happy to, but it would be 10 minutes as the Lambert’s were playing an audio clip from Pres. Eyring’s funeral address for Clayton Christensen.
She said ok, no problem, and said she’d wait outside the classroom and eat the snacks brought to institute. After the 10 minutes, I left and couldn’t find her. I walked all around the church building twice before finally giving up and going home.
When I saw her this week, I offered to give her a ride for which she was most grateful. David came with me, and we drove her up to the Provo Temple.
In some ways, not everything is right. She has some disorder. Yet, in the most important ways, everything is right. I felt sanctified being with her, as she continually shared her testimony. The church is her life. She hails from Tonga, and has been in the US for 8 years. Her parents both are dead now, and she has been working in the Salt Lake Temple as a cleaner. When the temple closed, she was out of a job, and moved down to Orem and cleans the Provo temple nightly, Monday-Saturday. She was so gracious and thankful and continually wished us the best and blessings for helping her. Little does she know, I was so truly blessed to meet her and listen to her and see her dedication to the Lord.
Friday, I left work and the sun was shining, and as often happens in situations like these, I ended up missing my exit and driving straight to the golf course. It’s still being renovated, but I enjoyed putting and being outside.

 

Saturday I had a date with Emma. She came over at 6 and together we made dinner together. We made rice, rolls, squash, and tried a new recipe that was bubbling around in my brain. It was peaches lightly sauteed with beet tops. We mixed it in with the rice, and it was delicious! Much better than I expected. We talked non-stop and it was a really fun time. The date would have lasted longer, but at 8:15, I walked her home as some ward members were coming over for Movie Night 2.0. We had some peaches, some ice cream, shed some tears, shared many laughs, and just had a good time while watching “La Vita é Bella.” (Life is Beautiful). A truly great movie. It was in Italian, subtitled in english. It’s a love story told in the shadow of the Holocaust and the main character illustrates what consecration to family looks like.

Porter and Cooper made it over for a pot roast that lives in dreams, and Porter again left as victor, beating us in Settler’s of Cataan.

I gave a talk on Sunday, and told 5 stories to help convey my message on consecration. First, I talked about backing up and crashing into another car while on my date December 8th, and heading up to the Christmas Devotional. The takeaway: I was distracted by the little things, causing me to miss what really mattered.

Second, I recounted a bit on the Alamo. Sunday was February 23rd, and it marked 184 years, going back to the year 1836, when Santa Ana had his troops surround the Alamo and begin a 13-day siege that ended with all of the defenders dead. Among them was George Washington Cottle. At the time, he was 24 (my age now) and was married. His wife was pregnant, and after his death, would eventually give birth to twins. He was given the option along with all others in the Alamo to surrender and leave alive. He chose to stay and fight, knowing that he would almost certainly die and never see his wife again. Yet, there are some things that are worth fighting for and dying for. I don’t think we can fully live until we decide what we are willing to die for. George Washington Cottle is an example of consecration to me.

Third, I told of how Clayton Christensen didn’t play in the championship game for his basketball team while at Oxford: It’s easier to be 100% committed to principles than 98%, as life is a series of extenuating circumstances that will constantly try our resolve to stay true.

Fourth, I told of another Clayton Christensen story, talking about how he spent an hour nightly reading scriptures and praying over every single page. That sacrifice of time seemed like a significant and untenable amount as he was studying full-time in a demanding program and had many demands socially on his limited free-time. Yet, Clay would say that he now uses advanced econometrics maybe once a year, but he uses the testimony he gained during that time, many times every single day. Every day we are investing our time, and investments in Christ and his Gospel will bring much more happiness now and down the road.

Finally, I talked about a lesson that struck me from reading Into Thin Air. The book tells the true story of the Everest Disaster of 1996. In short, before making the final push to the summit, the guides had the climbers promise to turn around when the guides said to. At 1 pm, they should be going back down, to make sure that they would return to camp before nightfall, when the temperatures dropped dangerously low, and the oxygen canisters would be empty. If someone was close to the summit, they could continue on, but at 2 pm, doesn’t matter if you are 50 ft from the top, you MUST turn around and go back. On the final day, some people stayed late, pushing towards the top until 3 pm. They caught “summit fever,” making previously unthinkable decisions in an attempt to reach the top and satisfy their desire. So it is with us. We often say we’ll do something, but if a better-looking option comes along, we’ll drop our previous commitment and go off after our desires. For me personally, this happens a lot at night, when I need to study something or visit someone, and instead I think “I’m worn out, I’ll read something easy for now, and I can always visit them tomorrow.” Or, I’ll open my computer to do family history, and instead spend an hour playing chess online. The problem is, tomorrow didn’t come for most of the climbers who stayed out too late. 8 died that night, their bodies being added to the collection already on the mountain, of those who didn’t do what needed to be done.

The invitation I left for my ward, and the one I’ll leave here, is to change one thing to be more fully consecrated to Jesus Christ. And once you decide that one thing, commit to it like you are on Mt. Everest, and your life depends on it.

The consecrated life is a beautiful life.

One thought on “Feb. 17-23: La Vita è Bella,”

  1. Good morning, Hunter,

    I was up early this morning because my Annabelle wouldn’t let me sleep. She wanted to eat, so I waited until 6:30 to feed her. She is so insistent–paws at my face so I have to get up.

    Reading your letter reminds me that you cannot judge a book by its cover. The woman you met, who is now working in the Provo Temple, looking like a homeless person and what you learned from her. You probably made her day and you might run into her again. You are a gentleman.

    Fun to have your brothers join you for pot roast. Looked good and I’ll bet it tasted good. I’ve never done one in the crock pot. I have a cast iron Dutch oven, and that is what I’ve always used. I know I tried to make beef stew in the crock pot, but the veggies never seemed to cook through, so I still do that in the Dutch oven, although I haven’t used it for a long time. I haven’t done much cooking. When I was seeing Leif, I used to cook a lot of meals for us. I miss that and him, but he’s made his decision and nothing I can do about that. I still can’t see him and Ruth together–strange relationship. I guess he needs to take care of someone and I wasn’t needy. Glad I am not needy, because I don’t need someone like that who has to hover. I’m probably too independent for him.

    We’ve had some nice weather–sunny and cold. The end of the week is supposed to warm up again. It’s been a very mild winter with very little snow which is not good for killing germs. No wonder so may people have been ill. I had my bronchitis for two weeks. I still have a little residual cough but am fine. It was a tough one.

    I think I will go to breakfast this morning, so I have to get washed and dressed. I shower every other day because the winter causes dry skin. There is always the sponge bath.

    I went to Emily’s party at Jenny’s last Sunday. It was very nice, and I got to see Adam who came down from Maine, Becky and Stevie, Rachael and Anna (Aaron had to go home and take care of the doggies, as they had been spayed), Mom Mom and Grampy, and Jenny’s friend,Ellen, along with Roger and Jenny and Mason. He is a very tall young man. Oh, Carole and Bob Keane were there as well. Carole is Uncle David’s former wife who joined the church a few years ago. They are now living in Gardner, so she is going to Jenny’s church. I’m sure she is a great addition with that beautiful voice of hers.

    Have a good day and sending love and hugs.

    Aunt Shirley

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