Feb. 10-16: Lupercalia Lunacy

Tuesday, amidst other activities, I eagerly watched the results of the New Hampshire primary come in. Bernie Sanders pulled out the win, and is in prime shape to become the nominee for the Democratic Party. Part of me likes him because he is honest about what he is trying to do, passionate, and seems to have the nations best intentions in mind. On the other hand, I can’t believe that roughly 1/4 of our nation is voting for a socialist and I don’t think his policies would help, but rather prove to cause great harm. Regardless, I do love politics and have enjoyed every debate so far.

In Book Club, we read Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar; the play starts off by talking about the festival of Lupercalia. This is a fertility festival, but I didn’t realize it was celebrated February 13-15th. The exact connection to Valentine’s Day remains unknown, but there was enough to make me dislike Valentine’s Day more. Women would run through the streets naked while being whipped by mn with leather thongs, believing this would make the women fertile.

Regardless of the origins, this was perhaps the best Valentine’s Day I’ve had. We organized an Elders Quorum activity and had a feast at the Bishop’s House. While 30 minutes away, I’m glad we had it there. Dillon smoked ribs to die for, along with bacon-bit macaroni and cheese, I brought four pies (2 chocolate, 1 coconut, 1 banana), some salad, and Reigen brought garlic mashed potatoes. Bishop and Sister Miner told the story of how they met and their courtship, and even sang an original song while playing the guitar for us. The rest of the night was filled with ping-pong and casual conversation.

Saturday, I went to the Provo City Center Temple with Tatiana. During a ministering visit, she asked us to help keep her accountable with her temple attendance as she is trying to go every Saturday. It was a great time.

Sunday dinner included only Porter and Cooper, and we ate corn chowder and butternut squash, while playing Settlers of Cataan together. Porter pulled out the win this time.

Clayton Christensen died a few weeks ago and I’ve enjoyed reading the tributes that have been written as well as reflecting on what he’s taught me. Admittedly, I remember meeting him at baby Ben’s funeral and afterwards at Mimi’s house, while Tanner was conversing maturely with him, I butted in and said something so stupid I immediately felt intense shame. I remember reading The Innovator’s Dilemma in high school and not understanding much. Most importantly, a few key lessons have stood out, that struck me when I first heard them and remain important principles I think of often and try to live by to this day. I’ll share one here. While at Oxford, he was the starting center for the basketball team. In England’s equivalent of the NCAA tourney, they were cruising through the competition when Clayton realized the final was on a Sunday. He had made a promise not to play on the Sabbath years before and was worried about this dilemma. In the semifinal, the back-up center suffered a dislocation and now there was even more pressure on Clayton to play. He prayed and asked the Lord if he could play on Sunday this one time, as surely this counted as an extenuating circumstance. He recalls how the answer came immediately and it was along the lines of, “why did you ask? you know what is right.” The coach told Clayton he expected him there, but Clayton stood by his convictions and the Sunday of the championship he was at church. Here are the main lessons: it is easier to be true 100% of the time than 98%. Once you yield, the next time becomes easier. Also, Clayton relates how he thought that the championship game was an extenuating circumstance, but has since realized that life is a series of extenuating circumstances. There will always be reasons to loosen up or lower standards. The older I get, the more I realize how extenuating circumstances do seem constant. Sometimes its ourselves saying “just this one time,” and other times its friends and family who are telling us, “just do it, this is a special case.” Stay true to your standards, 100% of the time.

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